-------Original Message-------

 

From: CDC

Date: 8/21/2009 8:07:10 PM

Subject: CDC H1N1 Flu Website Situation Update, August 21

 

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Updated Guidance for Businesses and Employers 

CDC has released new guidance that recommends actions that non-healthcare employers should take now to decrease the spread of seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu in the workplace and to help maintain business continuity during the 2009Ė2010 flu season. The guidance includes additional strategies to use if flu conditions become more severe and some new recommendations regarding when a worker who is ill with influenza may return to work. This guidance is available on the CDC website and on Flu.gov.

Learn more >>

Updated Guidance for Institutions of Higher Education 

CDC has released new guidance to help decrease the spread of flu among students, faculty, and staff of Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) and post-secondary educational institutions during the 2009-2010 academic year. The guidance expands upon earlier guidance for these settings by providing a menu of tools that IHE and health officials can choose from based on conditions in their area. It recommends actions to take now (during this academic year), suggests strategies to consider if flu severity is increasing compared with the spring/summer 2009 outbreak, and provides a checklist for making decisions. This guidance is available on the CDC website and on Flu.gov.

Learn more about the new Guidance and Toolkit >>

Key Flu Indicators

Each week CDC analyzes information about influenza disease activity in the United States and publishes findings of key flu indicators in a report called FluView. During the week of August 9-15, 2009, a review of these key indictors found that influenza activity had decreased slightly in the United States from the previous week. However, there were still higher levels of influenza activity than is normal for this time of year. Below is a summary of the most recent key indicators:

  • Visits to doctors for influenza-like illness (ILI) were highest in February during the 2008-09 flu season, but rose again in April 2009 after the new H1N1 virus emerged. Current visits to doctors for influenza-like illness are down from April, but are higher than what is expected in the summer.
  • Total influenza hospitalization rates for adults and children remain low and are well below the seasonal winter-time average of the last four years.
  • The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was low and within the bounds of what is expected in the summer.
  • Most state health officials are reporting local or sporadic influenza activity. Two states are reporting widespread influenza activity at this time. Any reports of widespread influenza activity in August are very unusual.
  • Almost all of the influenza viruses identified were the new 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses. These 2009 H1N1 viruses remain similar to the viruses chosen for the 2009 H1N1 vaccine and remain susceptible to antiviral drugs (oseltamivir and zanamivir).

Learn more >> 

U.S. Situation Update

Weekly Flu Activity Estimates

U.S. Patient Visits Reported for Influenza-like Illness (ILI)

U.S. Influenza-like Illness (ILI) Reported by Regions

Total U.S. 2009 H1N1 Flu Hospitalizations and Deaths
Posted August 21, 2009, 11:00 AM ET
Data reported to CDC by August 20, 2009, 10:00 AM ET

Reporting States and Territories*

Hospitalized Cases

Deaths

53 

7,983

522 

*Includes the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The number of hospitalized novel H1N1 cases and deaths presented in this table are an aggregate of reports received by CDC from U.S. states and territories and will be updated weekly each Friday at 11am. For state level information, refer to state health departments.

CDC discontinued reporting of individual confirmed and probable cases of novel H1N1 infection on July 24, 2009. CDC will report the total number of hospitalizations and deaths weekly, and continue to use its traditional surveillance systems to track the progress of the novel H1N1 flu outbreak.
For more information about CDCís novel H1N1 influenza surveillance system, see
Questions & Answers About CDC's Novel H1N1 Influenza Surveillance.

International Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
See:
World Health Organization.

For more information about the U.S. situation, see the CDC H1N1 Flu website.

International Situation Update

This situation report provides an update to the international situation as of August 21, 2009. As of August 13, the World Health Organization (WHO) regions have reported over 182,166 laboratory-confirmed cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (2009 H1N1) with 1,799 deaths. The laboratory-confirmed cases represent an underestimation of total cases in the world as many countries now focus surveillance and laboratory testing only in persons with severe illness. The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus continues to be the dominant influenza virus in circulation in the world. Decreases in disease due to 2009 H1N1 continue to be reported from South America and parts of Australia. The United Kingdom is also reporting national decreases in disease due to 2009 H1N1. In contrast, disease associated with 2009 H1N1 influenza is continuing to increase in southern Africa and more Africa countries have reported their first cases. In addition, 2009 H1N1 continues to circulate in tropical countries.

Learn more >> 

Recent Updates of Interest

  • Weekly FluView Map and Surveillance Report for Week Ending August 15, 2009
    During week 32 (August 9-15, 2009), influenza activity remained stable in the United States; however, there were still higher levels of influenza-like illness than is normal for this time of year.
  • Audio and Transcript for August 21 CDC Press Briefing
    CDC Joint Briefing with NIH & FDA on 2009 H1N1 Influenza
  • Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine Safety Monitoring: CDC Planning for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Health Officials
    Vaccines to protect against the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus are being developed. These influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines (2009 H1N1 monovalent vaccines) and are anticipated to become available in the fall of 2009. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has made recommendations regarding who should receive the 2009 H1N1 monovalent vaccine when it becomes available, including priorities for use of initial doses of vaccine.
  • 2009 H1N1 Flu: U.S. Situation Update
    As of 11:00 AM ET on August 21, 2009, CDC is reporting 7,983 hospitalized cases and 522 deaths in 53 states and territories (including the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands).
  • 2009 H1N1 Flu: International Situation Update
    This situation report provides an update of the international situation as of August 21, 2009. World Health Organization (WHO) regions have reported 182,166 laboratory-confirmed cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) and 1,799 deaths.
  • Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year
    CDC is releasing new guidance to help decrease the spread of flu among students, faculty, and staff of institutions of higher education (IHE) and post-secondary educational institutions during the 2009-2010 academic year.
  • Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Institutions of Higher Education
    The purpose of "Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Institutions of Higher Education" is to provide information and communication resources to help students, faculty, and staff implement recommendations from CDC's Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year.
  • Technical Report on CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year
    This Technical Report includes detailed explanations of the strategies presented in the CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year and suggestions on how to use them. The guidance is designed to decrease exposure to regular seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu while limiting the disruption of day-to-day activities and the vital academic activities that go on in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). CDC will continue to monitor the situation and update the current guidance as more information is obtained on 2009 H1N1.
  • UPDATE: Novel H1N1 Flu: CDC Response
    CDC is taking aggressive action to respond to the new 2009 H1N1 influenza virus and a possibly severe upcoming flu season. CDC's response goals are to reduce the spread and severity of illness, and to provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this public health threat. While the timing, spread and severity of the upcoming U.S. flu season are uncertain, CDC anticipates that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses and regular seasonal influenza may spread at the same time. It's possible that a lot more people will get sick this season than normally occurs during a regular flu season. There also may be more people hospitalized and more deaths this season than during a normal flu season.
  • Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to the 2009-2010 Influenza Season
    CDC is releasing new guidance that recommends actions that non-healthcare employers should take now to decrease the spread of seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu in the workplace and to help maintain business continuity during the 2009-2010 flu season. The guidance includes additional strategies to use if flu conditions become more severe and some new recommendations regarding when a worker who is ill with influenza may return to work. The guidance in this document may change as additional information about the severity of the 2009-2010 influenza season and the impact of 2009 H1N1 influenza become known. Please check www.flu.gov periodically for updated guidance.
  • Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Businesses and Employers
    The purpose of "Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Businesses and Employers" is to provide information and communication resources to help businesses and employers implement recommendations from CDC's Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to the 2009-2010 Influenza Season.

Additional Updates on the CDC H1N1 Flu Website

To learn about other recent updates made to the CDC H1N1 Flu Website, please check the "What's New" page on the CDC H1N1 Flu website.


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